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How to Watch the Longest Partial Lunar Eclipse and Blood Moon – The New York Times

Summary

When the moon shines in night skies on Thursday into the early hours of Friday morning, you will get a chance to witness a celestial phenomenon not seen since the 1440s.

A partial lunar eclipse, but really a nearly total lunar eclipse, is set to dazzle sky watchers and night owls early Friday morning (or late Thursday night if you’re on the West Coast). During the event, the moon will crawl into Earth’s shadow for just over six…….

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When the moon shines in night skies on Thursday into the early hours of Friday morning, you will get a chance to witness a celestial phenomenon not seen since the 1440s.

A partial lunar eclipse, but really a nearly total lunar eclipse, is set to dazzle sky watchers and night owls early Friday morning (or late Thursday night if you’re on the West Coast). During the event, the moon will crawl into Earth’s shadow for just over six hours, the longest lasting partial lunar eclipse in 580 years.

Here’s what you need to know about Thursday and Friday’s eclipse, which is also being called a blood moon and a Beaver moon.

The astronomical phenomenon will play out in night skies over North America, large chunks of northern South America, northeastern Asia and the eastern side of Australia.

The full moon will dance into alignment with Earth and the sun. Earth’s shadow will gradually shroud the visible lunar surface, then retreat to reveal normal moonlight, in a process that takes six hours and two minutes, to be exact, according to NASA.

How to Make the Most of the Night Sky

When you look up to the sky at night, it’s hard not to feel awe. And each year, there are many reasons to do so — from lunar eclipses to supermoons to meteor showers.

The extended show means you’ll have ample time to catch at least part of the eclipse. Starting at 1:02 a.m. Eastern time, the moon will begin to enter the outer part of Earth’s shadow, called the penumbra. It will gradually dim as the shadow creeps across its surface for about an hour before it becomes a partial lunar eclipse at 2:19 a.m., when it’s almost fully cloaked in the umbra, or the darkest part of the shadow.

At 3:45 a.m., the colors will become visible, flushing the moon in a rusty amber hue like a celestial sunset cast onto the lunar surface. This shade will build in intensity for the eclipse’s peak at 4:03 a.m., covering 99.1 percent of the moon’s face in Earth’s shadow. By 4:20 a.m., the shadow will cross enough of the moon’s surface that the colors are no longer visible, and the eclipse will fade as the moon slowly falls out of alignment. The spectacle officially ends at 7:04 a.m.

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Source: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/11/18/science/lunar-eclipse-full-moon-tonight.html